easter egg, handmade | Imperial War Museums

easter egg, handmade easter egg, handmade © IWM (EPH 641)

Physical description
A carved wooden Easter egg, in two halves, depicting on one side a painted rural scene with cottage, fields, trees and a blue sky, on the other side are large letters in gold…

via easter egg, handmade | Imperial War Museums

The Spitfire lost for almost 50 Years | Imperial War Museums

IWM, Supermarine Spitfire Mark 1a, IWM Duxford

IWM, Supermarine Spitfire Mark 1a, IWM Duxford

Built at Southampton in 1939, this Supermarine Spitfire Mark 1a was issued to No. 19 Squadron at RAF Duxford in April 1940. On 10 May 1940, Germany invaded France and the Low Countries, pushing the British Expeditionary Force (BEF), along with French and Belgian troops, back to the French port of Dunkirk. By the end of May 1940, Germany’s…

via The Spitfire lost for almost 50 Years | Imperial War Museums

Concluding Thoughts 1: | First World War Hidden History

President Woodrow Wilson addressing Congress before the US Declaration of War

President Woodrow Wilson addressing Congress before the US Declaration of War

A decade ago when we first took up the challenge of Professor Carroll Quigley from his seminal works, Tragedy and Hope and The Anglo-American Establishment to look for evidence of the secret cabal [1] and how they grew into the Secret Elite we were stunned by…

via Concluding Thoughts 1: | First World War Hidden History

Nancy Wake, in WWII – Freedom Fighter, Allied Agent and The Gestapo’s Most Wanted

The books and moments of history are filled with memorable names, courageous figures, and moments of sheer ingenuity. Yet not all names are as well recogni…

Source: Nancy Wake, in WWII – Freedom Fighter, Allied Agent and The Gestapo’s Most Wanted

Franz Reichelt: The Parachuting Pioneer and His Infamous Stunt

I do wish that ArtLark had found a different way to repeat their posts because I have to re-reblog every time as the previous year’s outing then no longer links to the content. Hence this reblog of a reblog today!

A R T L▼R K

51BjddXgkXLOn the 4th of February 1912, Austrian-born inventor and tailor Franz Reichelt, also known as the Flying Tailor, died tragically by jumping from the Eiffel Tower, whilst trying out his own creation, a coat parachute. Even though, having worked on the prototype for two years, and having had it rejected numerous times by aeronautic organisations and competitions, Reichelt had so much foolish confidence in his design that he decided to go ahead with his plan; he said: “I want to try the experiment myself, and without trickery, as I intend to prove the worth of my invention.”

“Reichelt’s pride and joy was a wearable parachute, so that airline pilots could deploy it to increase their chances of survival if they needed to eject from their aircraft (because that happens all the time?).Tests with a prototype from his fifth-floor balcony on dummies proved successful, but those prototypes weighed 150…

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Death as Entertainment at the Paris Morgue – Atlas Obscura

A corpse is carried out through the morgue, c. 1840s. PUBLIC DOMAIN

A corpse is carried out through the morgue, c. 1840s. PUBLIC DOMAIN

In August 1886, when curious Parisians opened up the newspaper Le Journal Illustré and read its cover story on “Enfant de la Rue du Vert-Bois,” a four-year-old girl found dead with a single mysterious bruise on her hand, they knew what to do. One by one, readers of the paper rushed to the Paris Morgue, where they pushed their way into…

via Death as Entertainment at the Paris Morgue – Atlas Obscura

Guest Post by William Ellis-Rees – ‘Empress Josephine and the creation of Malmaison’ – All Things Georgian

The Great Glasshouse at Malmaison by Auguste-Siméon Garneray. Musées nationaux de Malmaison, France.

We would once again like to welcome back to our blog, Classics teacher and author of  The Elephant of Exeter Change: A Tale of Cruelty and Confinement in Georgian London, William Ellis-Rees.

William’s guest post this time has as its subject, Empress Josephine, the wife of Napoleon Bonaparte.  Josephine is of course extraordinarily famous, and many biographies of her have appeared over the years.  However, William’s research has unearthed a curious story which does not appear…

via Guest Post by William Ellis-Rees – ‘Empress Josephine and the creation of Malmaison’ – All Things Georgian

September 12, 1940 Lascaux Caves – Today in History

Entering via a long tunnel, the boys discovered what turned out to be a cave complex, its walls covered with depictions of animals.  Hundreds of them.  Four teenagers in Nazi occupied France, had d…

Source: September 12, 1940 Lascaux Caves – Today in History

Merian C. Cooper, extraordinary life of a hero of 2 nations and King Kong | Pacific Paratrooper

Merian C. Cooper was born in Jacksonville, Florida, United States. He was the youngest of his siblings and at the age of six, he started to dream about exploration and adventures, a common dream am…

Source: Merian C. Cooper, extraordinary life of a hero of 2 nations and King Kong | Pacific Paratrooper

Hanging a Monkey as a French Spy During the Napoleonic Wars | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

What do you know of the Hartlepool Monkey and the “Monkey Hangers”? I certainly knew nothing of the tale until I stumbled across it. Legend says that a shipwrecked monkey was hanged as …

Source: Hanging a Monkey as a French Spy During the Napoleonic Wars | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

The History Girls: Dunkirk by Julie Summers

I went to see Dunkirk earlier this week. Not the town but the film of the same title written and directed by Christopher Nolan. It is a remarkable piece of art but is it a good film? And is it historically accurate? And does that in fact matter? I went with a completely open mind and was determined to leave my historian’s hat firmly at the door. Trouble is, I went…

Source: The History Girls: Dunkirk by Julie Summers

French Revolution Émigrés in England, a Guest Post from Lona Manning | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

Caricatures of England and France: the effete French dancing master meets sturdy John Bull. The punchline of this cartoon is a [pretty lame] pun. The English tax collector wants to collect tax on hops (used for making beer) and he understands that the dancing master “deals [in hops] very extensively.”

Did you ever read The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy? It’s a romantic and thrilling classic about the French Revolution. I’d like to share some of my research about the real lives of the refugees from that time…

Source: French Revolution Émigrés in England, a Guest Post from Lona Manning | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

Intermission Story (8) – Jimmy Stewart | Pacific Paratrooper

Jimmy Stewart suffered such extreme PTSD after being a bomber pilot in World War II that he acted out his mental distress during ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’.  Stewart played George Bailey in the classi…

Source: Intermission Story (8) – Jimmy Stewart | Pacific Paratrooper

Leigh’s Motor Ambulance & The Red Cross – GM 1914

This article first appeared in the Leigh Chronicle in August 1915 and provides an insight into the valuable work of the Red Cross during the war. Including supporting motor ambulances. 

‘The motor ambulance for wounded soldiers at the Front subscribed by the people of Leigh, at the instigation of the Mayoress ( Mrs.Ashworth), was on exhibition in Leigh on Friday. The van was…

Source: Leigh’s Motor Ambulance & The Red Cross – GM 1914

Madame Tussaud Used Beheaded Politicians to Create Her Original Waxworks

Madame Tussauds staff work in the wax studio on Marylebone Road, London, in 1939. PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID SAVILL, TOPICAL PRESS AGENCY/GETTY IMAGES

In the late 18th century, wax artist Marie Tussaud launched a somewhat unusual career in Paris. As a forced show of her loyalty to the French Revolution, she was ordered to create death masks of the guillotined aristocrats of the former monarchy, including…

Source: Madame Tussaud Used Beheaded Politicians to Create Her Original Waxworks