Celebrating St. Nicholas: the Story of the Three Condemned Innocents. | If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

The reign of Constantine The Great was not always stable. Borders had to be protected, laws enforced and if unrest broke out or even a sniff of conspiracy surfaced, Constantine also dealt with these matters seriously and harshly. Often though he left law enforcement in regional centres to be carried out by governors and local authorities. In this setting Church leaders or bishops would also come to play an important role in Constantine’s new world by acting often as imperial officials to administer law and justice. The people of the empire then not only looked to their prefects, but to their local Bishops to help maintain law and order. In some Christian legends, Bishops like St. Nicholas would play an important role in…

Source: Celebrating St. Nicholas: the Story of the Three Condemned Innocents. | If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

One might wonder what the early fifth century Byzantine world would have been like if Aelia Pulcheria was not around and her younger brother Theodosius II was led by other ambitious men? Sometimes,…

Source: Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

Ancient Ottoman and Byzantine shipwrecks discovered in pristine condition in Black Sea | Byzantine Blog

The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project has been on a mission to map out the floor of the Black Sea. The study was geared towards understanding how quickly sea levels rose at the end of the last…

Source: Ancient Ottoman and Byzantine shipwrecks discovered in pristine condition in Black Sea | Byzantine Blog

Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – The History of the Byzantine Empire

One might wonder what the early fifth century Byzantine world would have been like if Aelia Pulcheria was not around and her younger brother Theodosius II was led by other ambitious men? Sometimes,…

Source: Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – The History of the Byzantine Empire

Was the Ottoman Empire really history’s longest-lasting empire? | Byzantine Blog

The majesty of Istanbul’s ‘Blue Mosque’ (Tetra Images/Getty Images)

It was one of the most resilient empires in world history, but how did it start? And why did it end?

This article was first published in the May 2016 issue of History Revealed

Was the Ottoman Empire really history’s longest-lasting empire?

That’s a debate that is hard to fit into a nutshell. But, the ever-changing world power – an Islāmic network of countries comprising much of the Mediterranean coast (besides Italy) – began in 1299 and did not conclude until 1922.

This means that it certainly outstripped the British Empire in terms of…

Source: Was the Ottoman Empire really history’s longest-lasting empire? | Byzantine Blog

The shameful conquest and sack of Constantinople

April 12th 1204

The shameful conquest and sack of Constantinople.

The sack of Constantinople or siege of Constantinople was the final shameful act of the Fourth Crusade that had began the previous year in 1203. It was a culmination of events that led the crusader armies to the walls of the eternal city, in which the Latins had entered in an agreement to restore the rightful heir of the Byzantine Empire. Following the first siege of the city in 1203, the disgraced Emperor Alexios III…

Source: What happened this month in history? – If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

Masterclass in Byzantine Mosaics (Part 1) – The History of the Byzantine Empire

Who would have thought that a tiny small square piece of stone, glass or pottery called tesserae would have such an important impact on culture and art history? As far back as the fourth millennium, on the walls of the Uruk in Mesopotamia, pieces of coloured stone cones were inlaid in a pattern, that bear a resemblance to mosaics. In the period of ancient history, more familiar to us though, the Greeks and pre-Christian Romans, enriched the floors of Hellenistic villas and Roman dwellings with magnificent mosaics. Mosaics were made almost always strictly for the rich, in painstaking detail, by the best artists of the day. Some of the most popular subjects for mosaics in ancient Greece and Rome were…

Source: Masterclass in Byzantine Mosaics (Part 1) – The History of the Byzantine Empire

1,500-year-old wine presses found in Netivot, Israel | Ancientfoods

Original Article:

mfa.gov.il

November 2015

The excavation revealed the remains of a late Byzantine period village dating to the 6th and 7th centuries. One of the most impressive finds of the excavation is a sophisticated wine press that was used to mass-produce wine.

(Communicated by the Israel Antiquities Authority)

In the course of preparations for the construction of a new residential neighborhood in the town of Netivot in the Negev, the Israel Antiquities Authority conducted a salvage excavation of the site. Youths from Netivot and Ashkelon were encouraged to volunteer in the dig, along with a group of future IDF recruits currently performing a year of community service in the area.

The excavation revealed the remains of a late Byzantine period village dating to the 6th and 7th centuries C.E., including a workshop, various buildings and two wine presses. Fragments of marble latticework in the form of a cross and…

Source: 1,500-year-old wine presses found in Netivot, Israel | Ancientfoods

A Yorkshireman in Istanbul, 1593 | History Today

Soon after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, a young Yorkshireman named Edward Barton was despatched to the Sultan’s court to promote the interests of the Levant Company.

The capture of Constantinople in 1453 by the Ottoman Turks signalled the collapse of Byzantine power and, because the Turks knew little of international trade and commerce, it might have led to an administrative vacuum. But the Sultan, Mohammed, wisely decided to adopt many of the customs and institutions developed by the Byzantines during the 1,000 years of their Empire. Among these was the system of capitulations – a word derived from the Latin capitulae, meaning the chapters of an agreement or treaty governing the relations between the State and other nations and their citizens in Constantinople. The status and rights of non-Turks in the Ottoman Empire thus came to be defined by…

Source: A Yorkshireman in Istanbul, 1593 | History Today.

Byzantine ‘flat-pack’ church to be reconstructed in Oxford after spending 1,000 years on the seabed

Centuries before the Swedes started flat-packing their furniture, the Holy Roman Emperor Justinian had his own version, sending self-assembly churches to newly conquered parts of his empire.

From the Independent.

Now one of the “Ikea-style” churches, which spent more than 1,000 years on a seabed after the ship carrying it sank, is to be reconstructed for the first time in Oxford.

The Byzantine church will be on display at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology as part of the exhibition

Source: Byzantine ‘flat-pack’ church to be reconstructed in Oxford after spending 1,000 years on the seabed

In 1963 A Turkish Man Knocked Down A Wall In His Home… What He Found Next Was Unbelievable.

Originally posted on Trendingly.

It’s exciting enough to hear of people finding decades-old newspapers when decorating, but this tale takes things to a whole other level (quite literally!).

In 1963 a man in the Nevşehir Province of Turkey was renovating his house when he made an incredible discovery. Upon knocking down a wall, he discovered a secret room which led to something pretty spectacular…

This man had inadvertently stumbled upon the ancient underground city of Derinkuyu.

Derinkuyu was a multi level underground city that started out as a few caves, finally reaching its spectacular completion in the Byzantine era.

Its purpose was to offer protection during the Byzantine wars which raged from 780-1180.

Approximately 60m in depth, the city could accommodate 20,000 people as well as livestock.

The city boasted stables, cellars, storage rooms, chapels, and even…

via In 1963 A Turkish Man Knocked Down A Wall In His Home… What He Found Next Was Unbelievable.