5 Objects That Illuminate the Medieval Exchange Between Africa and Europe – Atlas Obscura

DURING THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD, BETWEEN the 8th to 16th centuries, West Africa was flush with vast resources and gold. Its kingdoms were some of the most prosperous the world has ever known. When the king Mansa Musa of 14th-century Mali made a stop in Cairo, Egypt, it’s said that he handed out so much gold to the poor that he single-handedly caused…

Source: 5 Objects That Illuminate the Medieval Exchange Between Africa and Europe – Atlas Obscura

“Frankly, I enjoyed the war.” Totally crazy story of Victoria Cross hero

Wiart in Cairo, Egypt in 1943

Wiart in Cairo, Egypt in 1943

“We’re going to have to ditch, sir, prepare for a landing on water!” was the last thing that the “Unkillable Soldier” Major-General Adrian Carton de Wiart VC heard from the cockpit of the Wellington bomber that was supposed to be…

via Frankly, I enjoyed the war. Totally crazy story of Victoria Cross hero who tore off his own fingers, lost an eye, was shot in the head & still went back for more

3000-Year-Old Pharaoh Ramses II Statue Found In Cairo Slum: It’s “One Of The Most Important Discovery Ever” – FLOW ART STATION

3000-Year-Old Pharaoh Ramses II Statue Found In Cairo Slum: It’s “One Of The Most Important Discovery Ever” A team of German and Egyptian archaeologists made a colossal discovery on March 9th – lit…

Source: 3000-Year-Old Pharaoh Ramses II Statue Found In Cairo Slum: It’s “One Of The Most Important Discovery Ever” – FLOW ART STATION

For Sale: Intriguing 19th Century Photos of Britain’s Colonial World – Atlas Obscura

The Taj Mahal. COURTESY OF ANDREW SMITH & SON AUCTIONS

In the 1860s, Jane Stewart was married to a Bengal Engineer, who served in the British Army in India. Stewart and her husband came from Scotland, towards the beginning of the British Raj, which began in 1858. The East India Company had governed large swaths of land for about a century before a…

Source: For Sale: Intriguing 19th Century Photos of Britain’s Colonial World – Atlas Obscura

Buried History: Tutankhamun | A R T L▼R K

On the 4th of November 1922, British archaeologist Howard Carter (1874 –1939) and his team found the entrance to the 14th-century BC Pharaoh Tutankhamun’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings in Luxor, …

Source: Buried History: Tutankhamun | A R T L▼R K

CAIRO: A 3,800 year-old mummy of a high class Egyptian woman has been unearthed on the west bank of the Nile River near Aswan, the antiquities ministry announced in a statement Tuesday – @AceHistoryNews | ‘ Ace Worldwide History ‘

#AceHistoryNews – May.27:

Photo courtesy of Ministry of Antiquities Facebook page

3,800 year-old mummy of high-class Egyptian woman unearthed in Aswan “The mummy of a woman named “Sattjeni” was found wrapped in linen bandages lying inside two coff…

Source: CAIRO: A 3,800 year-old mummy of a high-class Egyptian woman has been unearthed on the west bank of the Nile River near Aswan, the antiquities ministry announced in a statement Tuesday – @AceHistoryNews | ‘ Ace Worldwide History ‘

Almost 6000 years old case of Scurvy discovered in Egypt

Dr. Mamdouh El Damaty, minister of antiquities announced today the discovery of the first case of Scurvy (Vitamin C deficiency) in ancient Egypt.

AKAP (Aswan-Kom Ombo archaeological project) directed by Dr. Maria Carmela Gatto and Dr. Antonio Curci discovered a skeleton of a child who died younger than one year old was buried in predynastic Nag Quarmila settlement. (3600-3800  BC)…

Source: Luxor Times

1922-1930 The deconstruction of Tutankhamun’s tomb, in color

IMAGE: UNKNOWN PHOTOGRAPHER (C) THE GRIFFITH INSTITUTE, OXFORD. COLORIZED BY DYNAMICHROME FOR THE EXHIBITION “THE DISCOVERY OF KING TUT” IN NEW YORK

Perhaps surprisingly, the mummy of King Tutankhamun remains exactly where it was discovered by Howard Carter, on Nov. 26, 1922 — in its tomb in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings.

That does not apply, however, to the thousands of objects that accompanied the boy king on his journey to the afterlife — objects which Carter famously described as “wonderful things” when he first peered into the tomb’s dark chambers by candlelight.

The painstaking — and sometimes back-breaking — work of recording, cataloging and then removing every object, one-by-one, began in…

Source: 1922-1930 The deconstruction of Tutankhamun’s tomb, in color

8 Million Dogs Mummies Found in Necropolis – artnet News

Anubis <br> Photo: via <i> Ancient World Hisotry</i>

Ancient Egyptians mummified up to 8 million dogs as a sacrifice to the god of mummification and the dead, a study of the catacombs of Anubis in Saqqara near Cairo has revealed.

Researchers from Cardiff University in Wales were working at the ancient burial ground of Anubis—the jackal headed god—at the necropolis the ancient Egyptian city of Memphis when they made the spectacular discovery.

As with today, dogs were seen as a human’s loyal friend. However, they were also thought to act as bridges to the afterlife, as it was believed that they would communicate with Anubis on the human’s behalf, ensuring safe passage.

“It’s not some sort of blood sacrifice. It’s a religious act that’s done for the…

via 8 Million Dogs Mummies Found in Necropolis – artnet News.

Linking cultures: Sudan, Egypt and Nubia at the British Museum

British Museum blog

Anna Garnett, Amara West Project Curator, British Museum

The land of Nubia, the ancient name for the Nile Valley in the far south of Egypt and northern Sudan, was the vital link between the ancient Egyptian and Mediterranean worlds and the cultures and raw materials of sub-Saharan Africa. Although heavily influenced by Egypt over millennia, the Nubian and Sudanese cultures along the Nile were distinctly different from that of their northern neighbour, Egypt. During certain periods, Nubian states conquered parts of Egypt.

The Egyptian pharaoh Kamose, who reigned 1555–1550 BC, spoke of his struggle to reunify Egypt at the end of the Second Intermediate Period (1650–1550 BC):

‘To what end am I to understand this power of mine, when a chieftain is in Avaris, and another in Kush, and I sit in league with an Asiatic and a Nubian, every man holding his slice of Egypt?’

Earlier this year, new displays in…

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The mystery of the Fetter Lane hoard

British Museum blog

Amelia Dowler, Curator of Greek and Roman Provincial Coins, British Museum

In 1908 workmen excavating foundations for a house in Fetter Lane (City of London) found 46 coins in a pot. The Rev’d FD Ringrose purchased the hoard and published an account in 1911 but focussed on describing the coins rather than the circumstances of the find. By the time the coins were bequeathed to the British Museum in 1914, there was no trace of the pot and no description of it either. There is no full account of exactly how the hoard was found and whilst Roman hoards are often uncovered in Britain (for example the Didcot, Hoxne and Beau Street hoards), the Fetter Lane hoard remains something of a mystery.

Map London 1900 Extract from Pocket Atlas and Guide to London 1900 showing the British Museum and Fetter Lane (bottom right)

The Fetter Lane coins were all minted in Alexandria…

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King Tut’s Tomb May Hold Nefertiti’s Lost Tomb – artnet News

Originally posted on artnet News.

The funerary mask of King Tutankhamun at the Cairo Museum, Egypt. Photo: Tim Graham, courtesy Getty Images.

Does the tomb of Tutankhamun hold a secret passageway to the burial chamber of Queen Nefertiti? One researcher believes he has found evidence of a sealed-off door that he believes led to the famously beautiful Egyptian ruler’s tomb.

Nicholas Reeves of the University of Arizona has published a paper, “The Burial of Nefertiti?” based on his belief that high-resolution scans of the tomb (taken to create a life-size copy of the space) show traces of two walled-over doorways beneath the painted walls. He speculates that the “ghost” doorways would have led to a storage chamber and to “the undisturbed…

via King Tut’s Tomb May Hold Nefertiti’s Lost Tomb – artnet News.

 

Two Nerdy History Girls: Sarah Belzoni, an Intrepid Woman (from the archives)

Originally posted on Two Nerdy History Girls.

In celebration of the audio release of Mr. Impossible, I offer an earlier post about one source of inspiration for the book. Sarah Belzoni is a great example of the resourceful women who visited and explored Egypt in the 19th century.

Here’s a glimpse of what Sarah Belzoni dealt with in Egypt, traveling with her explorer husband (and sometimes on her own) in the early 1800s.  The excerpt is from Mrs. Belzoni’s Account of the Women of Egypt, Nubia, and Syria, which  was appended to Belzoni’s Narrative of the operations and recent discoveries within the pyramids, temples, tombs, and excavations, in Egypt and Nubia (originally published in England in 1820).

After waiting two months in Cairo, and understanding it might be some time before Mr. B. could return, I determined on a third voyage to Thebes, taking the Mameluke before mentioned. I went to Boolak, and engaged a canja with two small cabins; one held my luggage, and the other my mattress, for which I paid 125 piastres. I left Cairo on November 27th, and arrived at Ackmeim on the 11th December, at night. A heavy rain, accompanied with thunder and lightning, commenced an hour after sunset, and continued the whole…

via Two Nerdy History Girls: Sarah Belzoni, an Intrepid Woman (from the archives).