The Norwegian Who Inspired Darwin | ThorNews

mr-lawson-charles-darwinA Norwegian living on the Galápagos Islands may have changed the history of biology.

Nicolai Olaus Lossius was baptized in Veøy Church outside Molde in late 1790. No one in his family where sailors, yet he settled far from Molde and never returned.At 16, he went to sea, and one day many years later fate wanted him to meet a young man who would become one of the world’s most famous scientist.

Darwin

On 24 September 1835, HMS Beagle anchored up in Floreana of the Galápagos Islands. On board the ship was the 26-year-old theology student and coming scientist Charles Darwin.

The local governor was not present to greet him and the others on the ship, so the lieutenant governor welcomed them. The lieutenant governor was Nicholas Oliver Lawson.

In fact, that was not his real name. He was Nicolai Olaus Lossius from Norway.

Librarian Anders Kvernberg at the National Library of Norway has tracked Lossius through old letters, church records, sailor records and newspapers. He wanted to find out whether it was possible that Lossius actually met Darwin in…

Source: The Norwegian Who Inspired Darwin | ThorNews

The Incas and their Hand-built Roads

Organikos

An exhibition at the National Museum of the American Indian concludes that the ancient Incas were great environmentalists. PHOTO: BBC An exhibition at the National Museum of the American Indian concludes that the ancient Incas were great environmentalists. PHOTO: BBC

The Inca Road is one of the most extraordinary feats of engineering in the world. By the 16th Century it had helped transform a tiny kingdom into the largest empire in the Western hemisphere. And to the envy of modern engineers, substantial parts of the 24,000-mile (39,000-km) network survive today, linking hundreds of communities throughout Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Incredibly, it was constructed entirely by hand, without iron or wheeled transportation. A new exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC shows why the Incan kingdom built a lasting infrastructure.

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