TV Review – Titanic’s Tragic Twin: The Britannic Disaster and Dan Snow on Lloyd George: My Great-Great Grandfather | Enough of this Tomfoolery!

Celebrations for the First World War centenary continued in 2016 with events and new books published commemorating and observing the centenaries of the Battles of the Somme and Jutland. It is there…

Source: TV Review – Titanic’s Tragic Twin: The Britannic Disaster and Dan Snow on Lloyd George: My Great-Great Grandfather | Enough of this Tomfoolery!

Buried Somewhere in the Catskills is a Stash of Nazi Loot | Atlas Obscura

Liberty monoplane over New York City on first leg of its flight to Denmark, with Otto Hillig, photographer, and Capt. Hoérüs, pilot. (Photo: Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection)

An amateur pilot halted Nazi saboteurs during WWII, but did he then steal their war chest of cash?

Source: Buried Somewhere in the Catskills is a Stash of Nazi Loot | Atlas Obscura

Johann Struensee, the German doctor who ruled Denmark | Dance’s Historical Miscellany

For most people in the Anglo-Saxon world at least, Danish history is a blank, perhaps filled in only by vague memories of Hamlet’s line “something is rotten in the state of Denmark”. I’m going to write about one of the most significant figures in 18th century Danish history and possibly one of the most intriguing political figures I have ever…

Source: Johann Struensee, the German doctor who ruled Denmark | Dance’s Historical Miscellany

The Battle of Jutland – A Pyrrhic Victory For Germany?

A battleship squadron of the German High Seas Fleet. By Unknown – Aus: Abbot, Willis John: The Nations at War: A Current History. Leslie-Judge Co., NY, 1917; Download von Public Domain.

Even though Imperial German Navy was a well-prepared force during WWI, with a considerable amount of powerful vessels, it was still no match for the traditional…

Source: The Battle of Jutland – A Pyrrhic Victory For Germany?

Why Did the Viking Trading Town of Kaupang Totally Disappear? – ThorNews

The first trading towns in Scandinavia were established at the same time as the first Viking raids took place on the British Isles and the continent: Birka in Sweden, Hedeby and Ribe in Denmark and Kaupang in Norway.

“Kaupang”, which translates from “kaupangr” in Old Norse to “market” or “trading place” in English, was strategically placed in a narrow bay in Sikiringssal by the outlet of the Oslo Fjord, five kilometers northeast of Larvik in Vestfold.

Excavations confirm that the town was established in the years 780-800 AD, and for unknown reasons was abandoned about year 930.The trading place was divided into many small plots with…

Source: Why Did the Viking Trading Town of Kaupang Totally Disappear? – ThorNews

999 Years Since the Battle of Nesjar

Sword Viking Age

Olaf Haraldsson used the sword to gain control over Norway. (Illustrating Photo: Museum of Cultural History)

Today, exactly 999 years ago, was the Battle of Nesjar which is considered the first accurate dated event in Norwegian history. According to Snorri’s Kings Sagas, Olaf Haraldsson (Olaf the Holy) on Palm Sunday 25th of March 1016 AD did beat Earl Sweyn nearby Larvik in Eastern Norway.

“The earl maneuvered the fleet past Grenmar (Langesundsfjord) and docked at Nesjar”, Snorri writes.

The 21-year-old Olaf overcame a number of the most powerful Norwegian chieftains and took an important step in the long process towards the Christianization and unification of Norway.

Despite his young age, Olaf already had long experience as mercenary. As a teenager, he went to the Baltic, then to Denmark and later to England. Skaldic poetry suggests that in about 1014 he led a successful seaborne attack where London Bridge was pulled…

View original post 167 more words

Open Collections Program: Immigration to the US, Scandinavian Immigration

Immigration to the US from the Scandinavian countries of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland increased dramatically in the late 19th century, due to mounting economic pressures and overpopulation. In the late 1860s, for example, Sweden was struck by crop failures and famines that stimulated massive emigration. High unemployment and a lack of open land for new farms caused increasing numbers of Norwegians and Danes to emigrate to the US. The Homestead Act of 1862, which gave free land to settlers who developed it for at least five years, was a particular magnet for Norwegians, Danes, and Swedes. Facing internal political instability as well as persecution by the Russian government, Finns in large numbers began to emigrate to the US at the beginning…

via Open Collections Program: Immigration to the US, Scandinavian Immigration.