Flyting Was Medieval England’s Version of an Insult-Trading Rap Battle | Atlas Obscura

Flyting from Norse folklore and Old England should be incorporated into American politics. (Photo: Public Domain/WikiCommons)

Imagine a world that had swapped its guns for puns and its IEDs for repartees. Such a planet is possible if only those in power would manage their conflicts with flyting, the time-honored sport of verbal jousting.

Flyting is a stylized battle of insults and wits that was practiced most actively between the fifth and 16th centuries in England and Scotland. Participants employed the timeless tools of provocation and perversion as well as satire, rhetoric, and early bathroom humor to publicly trounce opponents. The term “flyting” comes from Old English and Old Norse words for “quarrel” and “provocation.” ‘Tis a form of highly poetic abuse, or highly abusive poetry—a very early precursor to MTV’s Yo Mama and Eminem’s 8 Mile.

“Court flyting” sometimes served as entertainment for royals such as Scottish kings James IV and James V. The most famous surviving exchange is The Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie, which was performed in the early 16th century by…

Source: Flyting Was Medieval England’s Version of an Insult-Trading Rap Battle | Atlas Obscura

1,500-year-old wine presses found in Netivot, Israel | Ancientfoods

Original Article:

mfa.gov.il

November 2015

The excavation revealed the remains of a late Byzantine period village dating to the 6th and 7th centuries. One of the most impressive finds of the excavation is a sophisticated wine press that was used to mass-produce wine.

(Communicated by the Israel Antiquities Authority)

In the course of preparations for the construction of a new residential neighborhood in the town of Netivot in the Negev, the Israel Antiquities Authority conducted a salvage excavation of the site. Youths from Netivot and Ashkelon were encouraged to volunteer in the dig, along with a group of future IDF recruits currently performing a year of community service in the area.

The excavation revealed the remains of a late Byzantine period village dating to the 6th and 7th centuries C.E., including a workshop, various buildings and two wine presses. Fragments of marble latticework in the form of a cross and…

Source: 1,500-year-old wine presses found in Netivot, Israel | Ancientfoods

Ancient Mayan tablet unearthed in Guatemalan jungle dates back 1,600 years — RT News

Originally posted on RT News.

A 1,600 year-old Mayan tablet has been uncovered in the ancient El Achiotal ruins of a temple in Guatemala. It describes a king’s 40-year reign during a period of unrest in Mayan history. The site is said to have been occupied between 400 BC and 550 AD.

“This stela portrays an early king during one of the more poorly understood periods of ancient Maya history,” Marcello Canuto, an anthropologist at Tulane University in Louisiana, says.

The discovery was made by complete accident; the dig had been ongoing for years, but the trench containing the tablet contained a previously unseen secret chamber, a shrine of sorts. The researchers had to crouch to explore it. Various objects normally found within ancient tombs were unearthed, along with…

via Ancient Mayan tablet unearthed in Guatemalan jungle dates back 1,600 years — RT News.