Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

One might wonder what the early fifth century Byzantine world would have been like if Aelia Pulcheria was not around and her younger brother Theodosius II was led by other ambitious men? Sometimes,…

Source: Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – If It Happened Yesterday, It’s History

Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – The History of the Byzantine Empire

One might wonder what the early fifth century Byzantine world would have been like if Aelia Pulcheria was not around and her younger brother Theodosius II was led by other ambitious men? Sometimes,…

Source: Empress Pulcheria: A woman truly ahead of her time. – The History of the Byzantine Empire

Flyting Was Medieval England’s Version of an Insult-Trading Rap Battle | Atlas Obscura

Flyting from Norse folklore and Old England should be incorporated into American politics. (Photo: Public Domain/WikiCommons)

Imagine a world that had swapped its guns for puns and its IEDs for repartees. Such a planet is possible if only those in power would manage their conflicts with flyting, the time-honored sport of verbal jousting.

Flyting is a stylized battle of insults and wits that was practiced most actively between the fifth and 16th centuries in England and Scotland. Participants employed the timeless tools of provocation and perversion as well as satire, rhetoric, and early bathroom humor to publicly trounce opponents. The term “flyting” comes from Old English and Old Norse words for “quarrel” and “provocation.” ‘Tis a form of highly poetic abuse, or highly abusive poetry—a very early precursor to MTV’s Yo Mama and Eminem’s 8 Mile.

“Court flyting” sometimes served as entertainment for royals such as Scottish kings James IV and James V. The most famous surviving exchange is The Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie, which was performed in the early 16th century by…

Source: Flyting Was Medieval England’s Version of an Insult-Trading Rap Battle | Atlas Obscura

The Roman girl buried beneath a London landmark | Flickering Lamps

30 St Mary Axe – better known by its nickname “The Gherkin” – is one of the most distinctive skyscrapers in London.  It stands on the site of the old Baltic Exchange, which was badly damaged by a Provisional IRA bomb in 1992 and subsequently demolished.  It was during excavations taking place prior to the construction of the Gherkin that, in 1995, the skeleton of a Roman Londoner who had lain undisturbed for 1,600 years was discovered.

On Bury Street, on one side of the skyscraper, there is an open paved area with seating and sculptures.  On the side of one of the low, smooth walls that double up as seats is a quite unexpected…

Source: The Roman girl buried beneath a London landmark | Flickering Lamps

The Patron Saint of Ireland | Theory Of Irony

In the year 401, half a continent away from Rome, a fleet of raiders sailed quietly out of Pagan Ireland, then sacked Britain’s west coast and absconded with thousands of terrorized prisoners to be auctioned off in the slave markets back home.  Among the poor souls swept up in the raid was a civilized, 16-year-old, Christian, middle-class, Romanized Briton, who found himself sold to an Irish “King” (or, petty warlord) for use in tending sheep.  This boy’s name was Patrick and he would change history, though Europe and North America would come to remember him in comical ways he would not understand (nor, do I).  For instance, contrary to popular belief, he never shepherded venomous snakes out of Ireland, for the Island had no…

Source: The Patron Saint of Ireland | Theory Of Irony

Ancient Mayan tablet unearthed in Guatemalan jungle dates back 1,600 years — RT News

Originally posted on RT News.

A 1,600 year-old Mayan tablet has been uncovered in the ancient El Achiotal ruins of a temple in Guatemala. It describes a king’s 40-year reign during a period of unrest in Mayan history. The site is said to have been occupied between 400 BC and 550 AD.

“This stela portrays an early king during one of the more poorly understood periods of ancient Maya history,” Marcello Canuto, an anthropologist at Tulane University in Louisiana, says.

The discovery was made by complete accident; the dig had been ongoing for years, but the trench containing the tablet contained a previously unseen secret chamber, a shrine of sorts. The researchers had to crouch to explore it. Various objects normally found within ancient tombs were unearthed, along with…

via Ancient Mayan tablet unearthed in Guatemalan jungle dates back 1,600 years — RT News.

Alexander the Great Mosaic Unearthed in Israel – artnet News

Originally posted on artnet News.

Researchers believe the mosaic depicts Alexander the Great. Photo: Jim Haberman via The Daily Mail

Researchers believe the mosaic depicts Alexander the Great.
Photo: Courtesy of Jim Haberman via Daily Mail.

An intricate mosaic depicting Alexander the Great meeting a Jewish high priest was uncovered in a 5th-century synagogue at the archeological site in the ancient village of Huqoq.

An extremely rare find, the mosaic is significant because it is the first non-biblical scene discovered in an ancient synagogue.

The colorful floor-piece shows a meeting of two men and also depicts several…

via Alexander the Great Mosaic Unearthed in Israel – artnet News.