REVIEW: Bridge | the Exhibitionologist

Part of Henry Aston Barker’s magnificent panorama of London from 1792, London from the roof of Albion Mills. Blackfriars Bridge, one of the great architectural achievements of Georgian London, was London’s newest bridge at the time and dominates the picture (© Museum of London)

It’s a well-known fact that without the River Thames, there would never have been a London. The Romans, who first founded Londinium in the first century AD, used the river to connect their new prov…

Source: REVIEW: Bridge | the Exhibitionologist

The Roman girl buried beneath a London landmark | Flickering Lamps

30 St Mary Axe – better known by its nickname “The Gherkin” – is one of the most distinctive skyscrapers in London.  It stands on the site of the old Baltic Exchange, which was badly damaged by a Provisional IRA bomb in 1992 and subsequently demolished.  It was during excavations taking place prior to the construction of the Gherkin that, in 1995, the skeleton of a Roman Londoner who had lain undisturbed for 1,600 years was discovered.

On Bury Street, on one side of the skyscraper, there is an open paved area with seating and sculptures.  On the side of one of the low, smooth walls that double up as seats is a quite unexpected…

Source: The Roman girl buried beneath a London landmark | Flickering Lamps

Watch the Destruction of Pompeii by Mount Vesuvius, Re-Created with Computer Animation (79 AD) | Open Culture

A good disaster story never fails to fascinate — and, given that it actually happened, the story of Pompeii especially so. Buried and thus frozen in time by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, the ancient Roman town of 11,000 has provided an object of great historical interest ever since its rediscovery in 1599. Baths, houses, tools and other possessions (including plenty of wine bottles), frescoes, graffiti, an amphitheater, an aqueduct, the “Villa of the Mysteries“: Pompeii has it all, as far as the stuff of first-century Roman life goes.

The ash-preserved ruins of Pompeii, more than any other source, have provided historians with a window into just what life in that time and place was like. A Day in Pompeii, an exhibition held at the Melbourne Museum in 2009, gave its more than…

Source: Watch the Destruction of Pompeii by Mount Vesuvius, Re-Created with Computer Animation (79 AD) | Open Culture