10 notable blue plaques of London – 4. Oldest surviving blue plaque commemorating a woman… | Exploring London

fanny-burney-plaqueMuch has been made about the dearth of women featured on blue plaques in this 150th year [2016] of the scheme – according to English Heritage, only 13 per cent of the 900 odd blue plaques in London …

Source: 10 notable blue plaques of London – 4. Oldest surviving blue plaque commemorating a woman… | Exploring London

Fight Against Slavery Carried on Beyond Austen’s Life, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

William Wilberforce spent his life seeking to abolish slavery. He succeeded in ending the buying and selling of slaves, but died six months before slavery itself began to be phased out.

William Wilberforce spent his life seeking to abolish slavery. He succeeded in ending the buying and selling of slaves, but died six months before slavery itself began to be phased out.

This piece is Part I of a two-part series from my fellow Austen Author, Collins Hemingway. In this one, Collins takes a closer look at the slavery issue during Jane Austen’s time.  Slavery was…

Source: Fight Against Slavery Carried on Beyond Austen’s Life, a Guest Post from Collins Hemingway | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

Oney Judge – For Black History Month | toritto

Absconded from the household of the President of the United States, ONEY JUDGE, a light mulatto girl, much freckled, with very black eyes and bushy hair. She is of middle stature, slender, and delicately formed, about 20 years of age.

She has many changes of good clothes, of all sorts, but they are not…

Source: Oney Judge – For Black History Month | toritto

Ely Place: a street in central London that used to be part of Cambridgeshire | Flickering Lamps

The heart of London is full of strange old places with unusual names and odd stories, but there is one place that for a very long time was not a true part of London at all.  Ely Place, just to the …

Source: Ely Place: a street in central London that used to be part of Cambridgeshire | Flickering Lamps

Charades with the Duke of Wellington – Shannon Selin

A game of charades in Vanity Fair

Charades, which began in 18thC France as a type of riddle, became a popular 19thC parlour game. Let’s sit in on a game of charades played by the Duke of Wellington in 1821.

Source: Charades with the Duke of Wellington – Shannon Selin

18th Century Tax on Gloves – All Things Georgian

Britain was struggling financially and so, needless to say, the government looked for ways to raise much needed revenue to balance the books. If it could be taxed, it probably was! In a previous po…

Source: 18th Century Tax on Gloves – All Things Georgian

Anna Maria Garthwaite, Silk Designer | Spitalfields Life

Waistcoat with silk designed by Anna Maria Garthwaite, woven by Peter Lekeux, 1747 (Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Zara Anishanslin, author of Portrait of a Woman in Silk, Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World published by Yale University Press, profiles Anna Maria Garthwaite, the most celebrated textile designer of the eighteenth century.

Source: Anna Maria Garthwaite, Silk Designer | Spitalfields Life

The East India Company: How a trading corporation became an imperial ruler | History Extra

Officers of the East India Company being entertained by musicians and dancers, depicted in an Indian image from around 1820. (Werner Forman/Universal Images Group/Getty Images)

Featured in BBC One’s new period drama Taboo as a company with huge influence and power – and one which is unafraid to further its interests by nefarious means – the East India Compa…

Source: The East India Company: How a trading corporation became an imperial ruler | History Extra

Trailblazing 18th-Century Mathematician Émilie du Châtelet, Who Popularized Newton, on Gender in Science and the Nature of Genius – Brain Pickings

Émilie du Châtelet (Portrait by Maurice Quentin de La Tour)

A century before Ada Lovelace became the world’s first computer programmer, a century before the word “scientist” was coined for the Scottish polymath Mary Somerville, another woman of towering genius and determination subverted the limiting opportunities her era afforded her and transcended what…

Source: Trailblazing 18th-Century Mathematician Émilie du Châtelet, Who Popularized Newton, on Gender in Science and the Nature of Genius – Brain Pickings

18th Century Stomachers – All Things Georgian

Like everything in fashion, stomachers came in and out of vogue, but during the 18th century they were very much statement pieces especially those made for the wealthier members of society and the …

Source: 18th Century Stomachers – All Things Georgian

Before Ellis Island, Immigrants Arrived at Castle Garden

Castle Garden 1825-28, by Alexander Jackson Davis. (Photo: Courtesy of the Battery Conservancy Collection)

Before Ellis Island was built, over eight million immigrants began new lives in America after walking through Castle Garden, a former beer garden and fort turned immigrant safe haven during a time of open immigration to…

Source: Before Ellis Island, Immigrants Arrived at Castle Garden

8 Historic London Shopfronts | Heritage Calling

Raven Row, 56 Artillery Lane, London E1

Raven Row, 56 Artillery Lane, London E1

London streets are lined with colourful shops, clamouring for our attention. Many are of considerable age, and have survived for our enjoyment only through careful maintenance by generations of sho…

Source: 8 Historic London Shopfronts | Heritage Calling

Two Nerdy History Girls: Before Refrigerators: The Ice House

Ice houses weren’t as rare in England as the excerpt fromAckermann’s Repository for June 1817 makes one believe. Neither were baths, for that matter. And London did have its share of both. In the 17th century, King Charles II had…

Source: Two Nerdy History Girls: Before Refrigerators: The Ice House