Shakespeare and Greenwich | The Shakespeare blog

The remains of the Tudor palace at Greenwich

There is something special about the place where important events took place, no matter how long ago. Even where there are no remaining signs on the ground people still visit: perhaps the draw is that these sites make us use our imaginations so strongly.

It’s always surprising to find bits of the London that Shakespeare knew beneath…

Source: Shakespeare and Greenwich | The Shakespeare blog

John Wilkes and Knighton Gorges Manor House – All Things Georgian

John Wilkes’s Cottage [near Sandown Fort] on the Isle of Wight. Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017

In the late eighteenth-century, John Wilkes, journalist, radical and politician, took a cottage on the Isle of Wight in which he installed his middle-aged mistress Amelia Arnold and subsequently he…

Source: John Wilkes and Knighton Gorges Manor House – All Things Georgian

French Revolution Émigrés in England, a Guest Post from Lona Manning | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

Caricatures of England and France: the effete French dancing master meets sturdy John Bull. The punchline of this cartoon is a [pretty lame] pun. The English tax collector wants to collect tax on hops (used for making beer) and he understands that the dancing master “deals [in hops] very extensively.”

Did you ever read The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy? It’s a romantic and thrilling classic about the French Revolution. I’d like to share some of my research about the real lives of the refugees from that time…

Source: French Revolution Émigrés in England, a Guest Post from Lona Manning | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

Madame Tussaud Used Beheaded Politicians to Create Her Original Waxworks

Madame Tussauds staff work in the wax studio on Marylebone Road, London, in 1939. PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID SAVILL, TOPICAL PRESS AGENCY/GETTY IMAGES

In the late 18th century, wax artist Marie Tussaud launched a somewhat unusual career in Paris. As a forced show of her loyalty to the French Revolution, she was ordered to create death masks of the guillotined aristocrats of the former monarchy, including…

Source: Madame Tussaud Used Beheaded Politicians to Create Her Original Waxworks

The ‘Black Mozart’ Was So Much More – Atlas Obscura

The inscription roughly translated reads: ‘Knight of St. George, a pupil of La Bössiere’s father, both in London and in Paris, the reputation of the greatest practitioner of fencing was equally appreciated as a musician.’ PORTRAIT BY MATHER BROWN (C. 1753)/PUBLIC DOMAIN

The 40 years between the American Revolution and the defeat of Napoleon gifted the world some wonderful music. From Haydn’s string quartets, through Mozart’s symphonies, to Beethoven’s dazzling works for piano—a music lover could paddle around the period forever. But one great figure of the age is often ignored: Joseph Bologne, also known by his noble title the Chevalier de Saint-Georges. This is a pity. A person of…

Source: The ‘Black Mozart’ Was So Much More – Atlas Obscura

Britain’s Futile Attempt to Keep American Colonists From Taking Tribal Land – Atlas Obscura

Picture this: In the 1760s, a team of colonial surveyors meets a group of leaders representing major Native American tribes in what will one day become the southeastern region of the United States of America. Together, they head out into the woods. Their task is to mark a negotiated border, by…

Source: Britain’s Futile Attempt to Keep American Colonists From Taking Tribal Land – Atlas Obscura

People with Disabilities in Jane Austen’s England, a Guest Post by Elaine Owen | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

York Vs York: Changing Attitudes in Regency England In April, Elaine Owen shared this piece on Austen Authors. I thought it worthy of a second look.  Jane Austen did not write about disabled people…

Source: People with Disabilities in Jane Austen’s England, a Guest Post by Elaine Owen | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

The History Girls: Her own worst Enemy: Caroline of Brunswick (1768-1821) by Charlotte Betts

Whilst Caroline isn’t the main character in The Dressmaker’s Secret, the factual events of her life frame the plot for my heroine, Emilia. She becomes a member of Caroline’s household in Italy, before travelling to England to find her lost family and unravel the mystery of priceless stolen paintings.

In 1794 Princess Caroline of Brunswick was twenty-six years old and…

Source: The History Girls: Her own worst Enemy: Caroline of Brunswick (1768-1821) by Charlotte Betts

Food Riots and Recession in Napoleonic-era England | Pen and Pension

Declaration by Norfolk Labourers Photo Nigel Jones CC

In 1793, the tensions caused by the revolution in France finally exploded into a pan-european conflict. In some ways, it was nothing new. Wars were endemic to most parts of the European continent. …

Source: Food Riots and Recession in Napoleonic-era England | Pen and Pension

Casual Racism… Anti-Semitism in the Regency – The Dark Days of Georgian Britain

In 1782, the German tourist, Karl Philipp Moritz toured England on foot and by stagecoach. He was a liberal Anglophile clergyman who loved the countryside and architecture of England but had mixed …

Source: Casual Racism… Anti-Semitism in the Regency – The Dark Days of Georgian Britain

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Remains of five archbishops found near Lambeth Palace | UK news | The Guardian

Builders find 30 lead coffins in crypt of former church next to archbishop of Canterbury’s official residence

Source: Remains of five archbishops found near Lambeth Palace | UK news | The Guardian

N.B. I’m not currently responding to comments or visiting blogs because of ill-health but I much appreciate your support.

Revisited Myth #114: You had to have two opposing teeth to join the army in early America so you could tear off the end of the cartridge. | History Myths Debunked

John Hill, Supervisor of Military Programs for Colonial Williamsburg, lays this one to rest. “I have heard many reenactors note the need for two opposing teeth as part of their musket-firing …

Source: Revisited Myth #114: You had to have two opposing teeth to join the army in early America so you could tear off the end of the cartridge. | History Myths Debunked

Anne Bonny, Eighteenth-Century Pirate Vixen | A R T L▼R K

A re-post.

On the 8th of March 1702, notorious Irish female pirate Anne Bonny was born as Anne Cormac, in Kinsale County Cork, the daughter of a servant woman and her solicitor employer. Trustworthy informati…

Source: Anne Bonny, Eighteenth-Century Pirate Vixen | A R T L▼R K