German Shipwreck said to contain Peter The Great’s Amber Room Reveals New Treasures

German shipwreck the Karlsruhe is finally being explored at the bottom of the Baltic Sea. But does it hold the remains of the legendary Amber Room, not to mention other precious items raided by Hitler’s men? Divers are certainly banking on it, though this painstaking journey is far from complete.

On Monday Baltictech detected objects on their sonar. Most intriguingly there are 10 chests – these had been shaken loose from the 196 ft steamship and …

Source: German Shipwreck said to contain Peter The Great’s Amber Room Reveals New Treasures

Surprising Pre-Regency Era Inventions, a Guest Post from Sharon Lathan | Every Woman Dreams…

John Spilsbury’s “Europe divided into its kingdoms, etc.” (1766)

John Spilsbury’s “Europe divided into its kingdoms, etc.” (1766)

Henshall corkscrew

Henshall corkscrew

CORKSCREW:  It is unclear who actually invented the first corkscrew to open bottles and jugs of corked beer, wine, etc. In the 1676 publication Treatise on Cider by John Worlidge, there is a reference to a device with a “steel worm used for the drawing of Corks out of Bottles” but there are no drawings or surviving examples.

What is certain is that Reverend Samuell Henshall of England was the first to obtain a patent for the simple tool, in 1795. The clergyman’s design included a…

Source: Surprising Pre-Regency Era Inventions, a Guest Post from Sharon Lathan | Every Woman Dreams…

Treatment of Slaves in the United States – Lives Our Ancestors Left Behind

Slavery throughout what is now the United States varied, depending on what time in history and what place you look at. Generally, slavery was brutal, especially on plantations. Whipping and rape were …

Source: Treatment of Slaves in the United States – Lives Our Ancestors Left Behind

October 21, 1797 USS Constitution – Today in History

USS Constitution vs. HMS Guerriere 19 August 1812 This painting by Anton Otto Fischer depicts the first victory at sea by the fledgeling US Navy over the mighty Royal Navy.

USS Constitution vs. HMS Guerriere 19 August 1812 This painting by Anton Otto Fischer depicts the first victory at sea by the fledgeling US Navy over the mighty Royal Navy.

‘…British and French vessels harassed American merchant shipping, kidnapping American sailors and forcing them to serve in their own navies, a practice known as impressment…’

Source: October 21, 1797 USS Constitution – Today in History

France Before the Revolution – For Bastille Day | toritto

The Queen’s Chamber at Versailles

The Queen’s Chamber at Versailles

…Versailles had all the pomp and pageantry of power.  The Court was composed of some 18,000 people, perhaps 16,000 of whom were attached to personal service of the King [Louis XVI] and his family with some 2,000 being courtiers, the favored guests – nobles engaged in a daily round of pleasures who were also feathering their nests seeking favors from …

Source: France Before the Revolution – For Bastille Day | toritto

On Catherine the Great and Smallpox | toritto

‘… Let us speak of Catherine the Great, Autocrat and Empress of all Russia…

‘Catherine had seen first hand the ravages of smallpox.  Catherine herself was spared but she saw the horrors of smallpox and probably decided to make efforts to spare her people from the kind of suffering she saw when ascending the throne.  An “enlightened” monarch with a great interest in science and the enlightenment literature of the age, she would lead Russia into its golden age converting it from a backward nation into a …’

Source: On Catherine the Great and Smallpox | toritto

Old Lifeboat House

On December 9, 1886, a huge storm caused the German registered barque, Mexico, to wreck. Initially, the Southport lifeboat Eliza Fernley was launched but on approaching the stricken ship, the vessel capsized in the turbulent waters. It washed up three miles from Southport, most of the crew members drowned…

Source:  Old Lifeboat House

 

Revealing NEW information about Dido Elizabeth Belle’s siblings – All Things Georgian

Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle Lindsay and her cousin Lady Elizabeth Murray, c.1778. Formerly attributed to Johann Zoffany.

Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle Lindsay and her cousin Lady Elizabeth Murray, c.1778. Formerly attributed to Johann Zoffany.

We’re very excited to be able to bring you some new information about Dido Elizabeth Belle.

Dido was the natural daughter of a former African slave woman and Sir John Lindsay; she was brought up alongside her cousin, Lady Elizabeth Murray at their great-uncle William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield’s estate, Kenwood House in Hampstead, London. You may have seen…

via Revealing NEW information about Dido Elizabeth Belle’s siblings – All Things Georgian

The Duties of a Georgian Footman – All Things Georgian

© The Trustees of the British Museum

© The Trustees of the British Museum

A while ago we took a  look at the below stairs roles of the household maid, the laundry maid and the cook, now we come to the role of the footman. Once again, we’re using the information provided by a certain Mrs William Parkes.

via The Duties of a Georgian Footman – All Things Georgian

When will Britain face up to its crimes against humanity? | News | The Guardian

slaveryOn 3 August 1835, somewhere in the City of London, two of Europe’s most famous bankers came to an agreement with the chancellor of the exchequer. Two years earlier, the British government had passed the Slavery Abolition Act, which outlawed slavery in most parts of the empire. Now it was taking out one of the largest loans in history, to finance the slave compensation package required by the 1833 act. Nathan Mayer Rothschild and his brother-in-law Moses Montefiore agreed to…

via When will Britain face up to its crimes against humanity? | News | The Guardian

Nancy Perriam – a woman in the Georgian Navy (Guest Post) – The Dark Days of Georgian Britain

How many women have you ever seen in movies or on television working alongside men during naval battles? The answer is probably “None”, yet many were there! There were lots of women aboard navy ships during before, during and after the Napoleonic Wars. And some, like Nancy Perriam, taking…

via Nancy Perriam – a woman in the Georgian Navy (Guest Post) – The Dark Days of Georgian Britain

MARIA EDGEWORTH – 250 YEARS ON – Turtle Bunbury

Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849) was painted by the Welsh artist John Downman in 1807.

Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849) was painted by the Welsh artist John Downman in 1807.

As the Great Famine ripped through the County Longford village of Edgeworthstown in 1847, a tiny octogenarian was to be seen making her way from door-to-door, offering food and nourishment. Many of the beleaguered occupants would have recognised her as Maria Edgeworth, the gifted story-teller whose books had been…

via MARIA EDGEWORTH – 250 YEARS ON – Turtle Bunbury

The Rapid Rise and Spectacular Fall of London’s Greatest Bonesetter – Atlas Obscura

Coloured etching by G. Cruikshank, 1819, after W Hogarth
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

IT WAS ALONG THE OLD Kent Road, somewhere between the town of Epsom and London, that a mob of 18th-century rabble rousers thought they spotted one of King George II’s hated mistresses riding in a carriage, and decided to harass her. But as the crowd gathered around…

via The Rapid Rise and Spectacular Fall of London’s Greatest Bonesetter – Atlas Obscura

“Dido” Elizabeth Belle

dido1

Dido Elizabeth Belle and the Lady Elizabeth Murray

“Dido” Elizabeth Belle was a bi-racial woman born into slavery in 1761 in the West Indies, the daughter of a slave woman, Maria Belle and a British career naval officer, John Lindsay, who was stationed there.

While the details of their relationship are unknown, Lindsay was transferred back to Britain in 1765 and took the child with him. Lindsay would later in his career be knighted and would reach the rank of Admiral in the British Royal Navy.

Lindsay entrusted the young girl to…

via “Dido” Elizabeth Belle | toritto

Admiring the Adelphi | Jane Austen’s London

In the 1750s the three-acre site between the Strand and the Thames that had once been occupied by Durham House was nothing more than a ruinous network of slum courts. It was to be transformed into …

Source: Admiring the Adelphi | Jane Austen’s London