A skeleton in the priest hole – House Historian

Priest hole in Havrington Hall, Worcestershire (Wikimedia/Quodvultdeus)

Yes, it’s true, I have researched a house where a skeleton was uncovered in an old priest hole! Certainly, one of the most unusual stories I’ve heard in researching the history of house…

Source: A skeleton in the priest hole – House Historian

Ely Place: a street in central London that used to be part of Cambridgeshire | Flickering Lamps

The heart of London is full of strange old places with unusual names and odd stories, but there is one place that for a very long time was not a true part of London at all.  Ely Place, just to the …

Source: Ely Place: a street in central London that used to be part of Cambridgeshire | Flickering Lamps

The East India Company: How a trading corporation became an imperial ruler | History Extra

Officers of the East India Company being entertained by musicians and dancers, depicted in an Indian image from around 1820. (Werner Forman/Universal Images Group/Getty Images)

Featured in BBC One’s new period drama Taboo as a company with huge influence and power – and one which is unafraid to further its interests by nefarious means – the East India Compa…

Source: The East India Company: How a trading corporation became an imperial ruler | History Extra

Shipwreck That Changed History Found off Florida Coast

The remains of a 500-year-old sailing vessel thought to be the wreck of the French warship “La Trinite” have been found off the Atlantic coast of Florida somewhere in the vicinity of Cape Canaveral.

The wreck, its exact location being withheld from the public to protect the site, may have been the flagship of a French colonization fleet sent by King Charles IX in the middle of the sixteenth century to establish a Protestant colony in the southeastern US. The French navigator who led the fleet, Jean Ribault, commanded the 32-gun flagship, only to lose the vessel and three additional…

Source: Shipwreck That Changed History Found off Florida Coast

London’s culinary streets: Artichoke Hill to Cinnamon Street – thestreetnames

artichokehillThere are three kinds of culinary streets, or so I have broken them down: the ones with straightforward names that seem, and are, obvious; the ones with less straightforward names that are, nonetheless, still obvious; and the ones that seem straightforward and obvious but are neither.

Let’s start with a street that is, surprisingly for many London street names, what it sounds like. Artichoke Hill in East London takes its name from an inn sign. The artichoke was adopted as a sign because…

Source: London’s culinary streets: Artichoke Hill to Cinnamon Street – thestreetnames

Queen Elizabeth I’s Vast Spy Network Was The First Surveillance State | Atlas Obscura

A portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, c. 1585. PUBLIC DOMAIN

In a lowly tavern in an English town in the 1580s, a group of men met to organize the assassination of their monarch, Queen Elizabeth I. The head of the operation, Anthony Babington, planned to rescue and crown Mary of Scotland, an alternative heir to the English throne who had been imprisoned in the castle dungeon for 20 years. He detailed the plan to Mary as a cipher—a secret note in code— and snuck it to her in…

Source: Queen Elizabeth I’s Vast Spy Network Was The First Surveillance State | Atlas Obscura

Black and British: Uncovering a Forgotten History | Heritage Calling

David Olusoga’s Black and British is a revealing exploration of the extraordinarily long relationship between the British Isles and the people of Africa, published to accompany the landmark BBC Two…

Source: Black and British: Uncovering a Forgotten History | Heritage Calling

“Henry VIII is actually one of my heroes” | W.U Hstry

“Henry VIII is actually one of my heroes”

I overheard these words from a senior gentleman. Now, this topic is a very controversial one as ‘Henry’ and ‘hero’ haven’t exactly met eye-to-eye in Tudor historiography. This Tudor has traditi…

Source: “Henry VIII is actually one of my heroes” | W.U Hstry

The Terrible Execution of the Babington Conspirators | London Historians’ Blog

430 years ago today – also a Tuesday – Anthony Babington and six of his co-conspirators were executed. A guest post by Mathew Lyons. On Tuesday 20th of September 1586, seven Catholic me…

Source: The Terrible Execution of the Babington Conspirators | London Historians’ Blog

Trip to Colditz Castle – W.U Hstry

Colditz Castle [Wikimedia]

Colditz Castle [Wikimedia]

In late July I was fortunate enough to travel Germany, taking in many of its cultural and historical sites. It is fair to say Germany did have plenty to offer in the famous cities and towns of Berl…

Source: Trip to Colditz Castle – W.U Hstry

The execution of Thomas Cromwell (1540) | The Lost City of London

On this day in 1540, Henry VIII’s Chief Minister Thomas Cromwell was beheaded at Tower Hill on trumped-up charges of treason and heresy, having eighteen days earlier been attainted, or  in o…

Source: The execution of Thomas Cromwell (1540) | The Lost City of London

Sex, brothels and prostitution… – EverythingTudorBlog

If you had ‘goose bumps’ in the 16th century it did not mean you had little bumps appearing on your arms because you were cold. Having ‘goose bumps’ was Elizabethan slang for having venereal disease. There were thousands of prostitutes or doxies as they were known, in Norwich, Exeter, York London and…

Source: Sex, brothels and prostitution… – EverythingTudorBlog

In the UK, It’s Still Legal to Place People in the Stocks | Atlas Obscura

The stocks in Roberts Park, Saltaire, Baildon, Shipley, West Yorkshire. (Photo: John Yeadon/CC BY-SA-3.0)

Generally, we think of public punishment as a relic of the past — a style of justice rendered obsolete by the development of the modern prison system which took criminal justice out of the town square and moved it behind bars. But this week, Thame town councillor David Bretherton has discovered that although public punishments have fallen out of favor over the past 200 years, they haven’t been entirely scrubbed…

Source: In the UK, It’s Still Legal to Place People in the Stocks | Atlas Obscura

Portuguese Slave Traders Were No Match for Angolan Queen Nzinga Mbandi | Atlas Obscura

In the 16th century, Portuguese slave traders turned to the Congo and southwest Africa, after their stake in the slave trade was threatened by England and France in the northern part of the continent. Their most stubborn opposition came from an unexpected source: an Angolan queen who ruthlessly…

Source: Portuguese Slave Traders Were No Match for Angolan Queen Nzinga Mbandi | Atlas Obscura