The French Invasion | The Isle of Wight | The History Project

21july1545iowIt was on this day, 21st July back in 1545 when the French tried to invade the Isle of Wight but failed when their troops were repelled.  The invasion attempt came just days after the Mary Rose sank whilst battling against a French invasion fleet, said to be larger than that of the Spanish Armada years later.  Following years of unrest in Catholic Europe, the King of France…

via The French Invasion | The Isle of Wight | The History Project

The Sweating Sickness in Tudor London (Edward VI, 1551) | The Lost City of London

On this day in 1551, the boy-King, Edward VI wrote:

“At this time came the sweat into London, which was more vehement than the old sweat.  For if one took cold he died within 3 hours, and if he escaped it held him but 9 hours, or 10 at the most.  Also if he slept … , as he should be very desirous to do, then he raved, and should die raving”…

via The Sweating Sickness in Tudor London (Edward VI, 1551) | The Lost City of London

When will Britain face up to its crimes against humanity? | News | The Guardian

slaveryOn 3 August 1835, somewhere in the City of London, two of Europe’s most famous bankers came to an agreement with the chancellor of the exchequer. Two years earlier, the British government had passed the Slavery Abolition Act, which outlawed slavery in most parts of the empire. Now it was taking out one of the largest loans in history, to finance the slave compensation package required by the 1833 act. Nathan Mayer Rothschild and his brother-in-law Moses Montefiore agreed to…

via When will Britain face up to its crimes against humanity? | News | The Guardian

The face of history – A visit to Haddon Hall III | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Kathleen Manners, 9th Duchess of Rutland. Sketch for an oil painting by Laura Knight.

Kathleen Manners, 9th Duchess of Rutland. Sketch for an oil painting by Laura Knight.

Although there are the grand tapestries, Great Hall and Long Gallery, as well as all the trappings of magnificence, there are corners of Haddon Hall that do not feel like a grand and glorious Country House. They simply feel like home. Being midwinter, I think we may have seen the interior, at least, at its best… though I would love to see the gardens in summer. Roaring fires, the scent of pine and woodsmoke hanging, heavy as incense, in the air of low-ceilinged rooms, all make the place…

via The face of history – A visit to Haddon Hall III | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

The History Girls: ‘Accused of witchcraft and murder in 1518 and 2018’ by Karen Maitland

Sidonie, from a painting by Lucas Cranach, 1550

Sidonie, from a painting by Lucas Cranach, 1550

I was horrified, but sadly not surprised, to read of the terrible ordeal of a mother and daughter in Jharkhand State, India who, in February 2018, were dragged from their house by relatives, had their heads shaved and were…

via The History Girls: ‘Accused of witchcraft and murder in 1518 and 2018’ by Karen Maitland

From royal trumpeter to chief diver, Miranda Kaufmann uncovers the Africans of Tudor Britain

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A 16TH-CENTURY PORTRAIT OF AN AFRICAN MAN BY JAN MOSTAERT

As Kaufmann writes “it is vital to understand that the British Isles have always been peopled by immigrants”.

via From royal trumpeter to chief diver, Miranda Kaufmann uncovers the Africans of Tudor Britain

All in the details – A visit to Haddon Hall II

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Other than the Elizabethan connection, we really had, at that point, no idea why we had felt the need to visit Haddon Hall. We knew little about the place, apart from the legend of the romantic elopement of Dorothy Vernon and the fact that ‘ye harmytt’ of Cratcliffe Crags had supplemented his hermit’s income by supplying rabbits to…

via All in the details – A visit to Haddon Hall II | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

All in the details – A visit to Haddon Hall II | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

hh2

Other than the Elizabethan connection, we really had, at that point, no idea why we had felt the need to visit Haddon Hall. We knew little about the place, apart from the legend of the romantic elopement of Dorothy Vernon…

via All in the details – A visit to Haddon Hall II | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

A visit to Haddon Hall | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

The Vernons mentioned are my forbears! haddonhall

Every time we had driven past Haddon Hall, I had the feeling we needed to go there. The feeling bugged me a bit, as stately homes have not really been part of our research. We tend to be drawn to the landscape and sites things five thousand years old, rather than five hundred, so I could not see why…

via A visit to Haddon Hall | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Shakespeare and Greenwich | The Shakespeare blog

The remains of the Tudor palace at Greenwich

There is something special about the place where important events took place, no matter how long ago. Even where there are no remaining signs on the ground people still visit: perhaps the draw is that these sites make us use our imaginations so strongly.

It’s always surprising to find bits of the London that Shakespeare knew beneath…

Source: Shakespeare and Greenwich | The Shakespeare blog

Sixteenth-Century Feminist: Lavinia Fontana | A R T L▼R K

On the 24th of August 1552, Italian painter Lavinia Fontana was born in Bologna. She is considered the first ever woman artist to work within the same sphere as her male counterparts, independentl…

Source: Sixteenth-Century Feminist: Lavinia Fontana | A R T L▼R K

The Spanish Armada of 1588 – just history posts

The Spanish Armada is one of the most famous events in English history, and a story that many can recount. The terrible Spanish tried to invade to depose the beloved Elizabeth I, but due to English…

Source: The Spanish Armada of 1588 – just history posts

To His Son Benedict from the Tower of London by John Hoskyns

19th-century engraving of The Trusty Servant, from the 1579 painting by John Hoskins [sic]

The epigram attached to the Hoskyns family is ‘Imprison thy tongue or it will thee.’ In other words, keep your trap shut or you’ll end up in trouble! His descendants, which include the owner of this blog, still have similar problems because we tend to open our mouths when it would be prudent to keep our thoughts to ourselves. John Hoskyns was imprisoned at the same time as John Aubrey, who mentions him in Brief Lives.

1614
To His Son Benedict from the Tower of London by John Hoskyns 1614

Sweet Benedict, whilst thou art young,
And know’st not yet the use of tongue,
Keep it in thrall whilst thou art free:
Imprison it or it will thee.

John Hoskyns (1566-1638)

© Sarah Vernon

The mysterious Tudor epidemic that killed thousands… – EverythingTudorBlog

Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Euricius Cordus (1486-1535);

In August 1485, Henry Tudor had just won his crown from Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth field. By October of the same year, several thousand of his subjects would be dead of a mysterious…

Source: The mysterious Tudor epidemic that killed thousands… – EverythingTudorBlog

When High-Class Ladies Wore Masks That Made It Impossible to Speak | Atlas Obscura

A 1581 depiction of a man and his wife, who is sporting a visard. HABITS DE FRANCE/PUBLIC DOMAIN

For refined, upper-class ladies in 16th-century Europe, getting a tan, especially on your face, was not a good look.

The implication of such coloring was that one must work outside, and thus, quite possibly be poor (cue gasps and swooning faints). So to make sure they didn’t get burned, some 16th-century ladies wore face masks called visards (or vizards) that covered their delicate visages. Unfortunately, the masks also…

Source: When High-Class Ladies Wore Masks That Made It Impossible to Speak | Atlas Obscura