1948: After the Windrush — Retronaut

Above: Men and women gather in the bows of their tender prior to stepping ashore at Southampton to undergo routine checks by Passport and Customs officials, 1954. A one-way ticket cost £100, and the original press caption for this image ran: "Their assets are a few pounds in their pockets and a touching faith in Great Britain."

Above: Men and women gather in the bows of their tender prior to stepping ashore at Southampton to undergo routine checks by Passport and Customs officials, 1954. A one-way ticket cost £100, and the original press caption for this image ran: “Their assets are a few pounds in their pockets and a touching faith in Great Britain.”

Despite having paid £100 for a one-way ticket on the Empire Windrush – and the other vessels that were to follow in its metaphorical wake – the 492 people arriving at Tilbury, England were to find their journey had yet to be concluded.

They had come to England at the invitation of a British Government eager to replenish its national workforce – more than 380,000 United Kingdom’s population had been killed during the Second World War. In 1948, in order for mass immigration from…

via 1948: After the Windrush — Retronaut

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4 thoughts on “1948: After the Windrush — Retronaut

  1. Great pictures. I worked for many years with the son of two Windrush-era immigrants. He was my crew-mate in the Ambulance Service, and his parents had come over to get work here. His Dad was a bus driver at Shepherd’s Bush Bus Garage, and his Mum a school dinner lady. They were from Barbados, and I never met a nicer or friendlier family. Andy was born in Barbados, and looked after by his grandmother there, until his parents had settled in London. He later served for five years in the British Army, before joining the London Ambulance Service, where he worked until his retirement, in 2016. I worked with him for seven years in London, and I am proud to call him one of my best friends.
    Best wishes, Pete.

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