The Rapid Rise and Spectacular Fall of London’s Greatest Bonesetter – Atlas Obscura

Coloured etching by G. Cruikshank, 1819, after W Hogarth
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images

IT WAS ALONG THE OLD Kent Road, somewhere between the town of Epsom and London, that a mob of 18th-century rabble rousers thought they spotted one of King George II’s hated mistresses riding in a carriage, and decided to harass her. But as the crowd gathered around…

via The Rapid Rise and Spectacular Fall of London’s Greatest Bonesetter – Atlas Obscura

5 thoughts on “The Rapid Rise and Spectacular Fall of London’s Greatest Bonesetter – Atlas Obscura

  1. It was reported that her coach went at a speed few others would chance, given the state of the roads. Mrs Mapp was indeed once mistaken on the Old Kent Road by the London mob for one of the king’s mistresses. Hearing the crowd shouting after her that she was ‘a Hanover whore’, she finally let down her window and bellowed back that she was no Hanover whore, she was an English one.

    Sarah’s short-lived marriage was spectacularly less successful than her sister’s. Her sister was an actress known professionally as Maria Warren and who had stepped into the part of Polly Peachum in The Beggar’s Opera when former child prostitute and starlet Lavinia Fenton quit to become the Duchess of Bolton. Sister Maria had a superfluity of husbands — she only escaped a bigamy charge when her clever lawyer read out the relevant Act of Parliament in court. For the omission of the word ‘husband’ in the Act, it seemed that men could not marry twice, but that women could, according to the law.

    In 1736 Mrs Mapp was performing high society operations in front of Queen Caroline in Hampton Court; being invited to hear a song about herself in a new play; guest of honour at the dissection of a recently hanged thief and notorious jail breaker Daniel Malden — and by the following Christmas she was in a pauper’s grave.

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