The fatal hike that became a Nazi propaganda coup | Kate Connolly | World news | The Guardian

The memorial to one of the schoolboys Jack Alexander Eaton, commissioned by his father and paid for by local villagers. Photograph: Christian Jungeblodt for the Guardian

The lilac was in full bloom when a group of boys from the Strand school in Brixton and Kenneth Keast, their 27-year-old master, left Freiburg for the opening hike of their 10-day Easter trekking tour in the southern Black Forest. It was the morning of 17 April 1936, as they set off for the village of Todtnauberg, over 15 miles away, across the summit of the Schauinsland mountain. By the time they emerged from a wood about three hours later, snow was falling steadily but they were full of spring-time optimism. The boys broke ranks to…

Source: The fatal hike that became a Nazi propaganda coup | Kate Connolly | World news | The Guardian

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