The Nuremberg Trial | Literaturesalon’s Blog

How do you punish the perpetrators of the biggest genocide in human history? Do they deserve a fair trial, which their millions of victims never got? These are some of the questions the Allies debated during and after WWII. They were eventually resolved by the Nuremberg Trial, which Ann and John Tusa describe in vivid detail in their book by the same name (The Nuremberg Trial, New York: Atheneum, 1986). Several options were suggested, even before the war was over and the Ally victory secured.

Documents released in 2006 from the British War Cabinet indicate that in December 1944 the Cabinet considered a swift and severe punishment of the Nazi leaders involved in crimes against humanity. Winston Churchill suggested summary execution of the top Nazi leaders. A year earlier, at the Tehran Conference, Joseph Stalin proposed executing 50,000-100,000 Nazi officers. Roosevelt appeared prepared to go on board with this idea, but at the time Churchill vehemently objected, stating that most of them were…

Source: The Nuremberg Trial | Literaturesalon’s Blog

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2 thoughts on “The Nuremberg Trial | Literaturesalon’s Blog

  1. I have often thought that these horrible people were dealt with in a respectful and dignified manner, unlike the horrors they perpetrated themselves. So many culprits escaped though, some to flee to comfortable lives in the USA.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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