Seriously, though, was the American Revolution a Civil War? « The Junto

On February 18, 2014, Tom Cutterham asked, “Was the American Revolution a Civil War?” According to Cutterham, understanding the Revolution that way might be useful. If we did, he suggested, “we’d better understand the way the modern world—the nexus of state, citizen, and property—was born in and determined by violence.”[1]

Understanding the American Revolution as a civil war is an accepted concept. In 1975, John Shy argued that the Revolution was a civil war. Since then, a number of historians have made similar propositions. More recently, in 2012, Alan Taylor delivered a talk, in New Mexico, titled “The First American Civil War: The Revolution.” There are other instances, too, and they are not hard to find or engage with. I don’t think historians will jettison the civil war framework, either. Indeed, we will be understanding the Revolution as a civil war indefinitely.[2]

Was the American Revolution a “civil war,” though? I mean, seriously? Or, is framing the Revolution as a…

Source: Seriously, though, was the American Revolution a Civil War? « The Junto.

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One thought on “Seriously, though, was the American Revolution a Civil War? « The Junto

  1. There were undoubtedly those who changed sides, and many who fought fervently for the British against the revolutionaries. German troops were used by the King, and French troops fought for the colonial army. In many ways, it has all the hallmarks of a civil war, except that it was a colony of a world power, not a sovereign country.
    My own conclusion is that it was a revolution, and an act of self-determination by settlers who wanted to found their own independent country. So not a civil war, but an interesting concept, nonetheless.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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