IG Farben: Manufacturing Death | Literaturesalon’s Blog

View of the Reichstag assembly after Hitler’s speech in Berlin on Jan. 30, 1937. Left first row, right: Adolf Hitler. Standing on the steps: the Prussian Premier Hermann Goering. (AP Photo)

IG Farben didn’t start out as a Nazi death factory, which is what it’s known for to this day. In fact, up to the mid 1930s its chief executives were not particularly anti-Semitic. Formed in 1925, IG Farben started out as a chemical company that manufactured dye. It was so successful, that by the 1930s it became the largest chemical company in the world and the fourth largest company in general. One of its leaders, Carl Bosch, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1931 for the development of chemical high-pressure methods. In Hell’s Cartel: IG Farben and the Making of Hitler’s War Machine (New York, Henry Holt and Company, 2008), Diarmuid Jeffreys describes the progression—or, more fittingly, regression–of IG Farben from Germany’s leading chemical company to a death factory during the Holocaust.

Jeffreys records of the most telling moments of this transition: the episode when the company’s leader, Carl Bosch, who valued the scientific work of many of his Jewish colleagues and employees, paid a visit to Hitler himself in the attempt to…

Source: IG Farben: Manufacturing Death | Literaturesalon’s Blog

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4 thoughts on “IG Farben: Manufacturing Death | Literaturesalon’s Blog

  1. I like your new picture, with you showcased in the gallery!

    I knew about this company, and the sorry results at Nuremberg. I have had a Volkswagen car, a Fiat car, a Hugo Boss watch, and other German or Italian products around the house. Then again, I also have a Japanese TV, so it seems that consumerism has dulled the memory of wartime atrocities and exploitation.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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