Memory and identity: a personal history – Mathew Lyons

My father is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s. He will be 90 this year. He grew up close by the docks in Beckton, East London, which are now long gone. He remembers seeing the first wave of German bombers flying over London on September 7, 1940.

He was stationed in the Pacific when he joined the Navy in 1944; he has photos of Nagasaki taken a few weeks after it was destroyed by the atomic bomb.

At Cambridge after the war, he joined the Communist Party only to leave in the 1950s, disheartened by the party’s refusal to fully endorse the democratic process. At least, this is what I remember being told long ago, when facts seemed more stable than they do now.He spent almost his entire working life in…

Source: Memory and identity: a personal history – Mathew Lyons

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2 thoughts on “Memory and identity: a personal history – Mathew Lyons

  1. A well-written, personal and thoughtful piece that raises many of the questions we ask ourselves about our place in history. When parents or friends become sick, or too old to be what we remember them as, it is very true that we start to think more about their illness or condition than the person they still are.
    Mathew has done well to highlight this, and gives us much to think about.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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