Hogarth At Bart’s Hospital

In 1733, when William Hogarth heard that the governors of St Bartholomew’s Hospital in Smithfield were considering commissioning the Venetian artist, Jocopo Amigoni, to paint a mural in the newly constructed North Wing of the hospital, he offered his own services free. Always insecure about his social status, it was a gesture of largesse that made him look good and provided the opportunity for Hogarth to prove that an English artist could excel in the grand historical style. Yet such was the mistaken nature of Hogarth’s ambition that his “Jesus at the Pool of Bethesda” is a curious hybrid at best. Illustrating Christ healing the sick, each of the figures in the painting illustrate different ailments, a bizarre notion that undermines Hogarth’s aspiration to the sublime classical style and results in a…

Source: Hogarth At Bart’s Hospital

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2 thoughts on “Hogarth At Bart’s Hospital

  1. I have been to Bart’s many times in the course of my duties, but only to the A&E, when it was still open. I never got to see this at the time, but I don’t think it;s that bad, and it does adorn the wall of a hospital, after all.
    I prefer The Rake’s Progress, it has to be said.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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