In 1844, the Philippines Skipped a Day, And It Took Decades for the Rest of the World to Notice | Atlas Obscura

One of the marvels of modern civilization is that, for the most part, humans all around the globe have agreed on one system for counting days and hours. This is a recent development. While people have generally relied on the cycles of the moon, Earth and sun to measure time, at least 80 different calendars have been used, some more closely aligned than others.

And no system is perfect. The most common timekeeper, the  Gregorian calendar, is filled with eccentricities. February is so short, random months have 30 days, and the formula for leap-years defies logic (it is a lot more complicated than “every four years”). This all has to do with keeping Easter in the right place; there’s no good reason, on the other hand, for the…

Source: In 1844, the Philippines Skipped a Day, And It Took Decades for the Rest of the World to Notice | Atlas Obscura

Advertisements

One thought on “In 1844, the Philippines Skipped a Day, And It Took Decades for the Rest of the World to Notice | Atlas Obscura

What are your thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s