Robert Hooke and the Dog’s Lung: Animal Experimentation in History « The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice

Originally posted on The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice.

In 1664, Robert Hooke—a pioneering member of the Royal Society and lead scientific thinker of his day—decided to investigate the mechanisms involved in breathing. In his laboratory, he strapped a stray dog to his table. Then, taking his scalpel, he proceeded to slice the terrified animal’s chest off so he could peer inside the thoracic cavity.

What Hooke hadn’t realised before he began his experiment was that lungs were not muscles, and that by removing the animal’s chest, he had removed the dog’s ability to breathe on its own. To keep the animal alive, Hooke pushed a hollow cane down the dog’s throat and into its windpipe. He then…

via Robert Hooke and the Dog’s Lung: Animal Experimentation in History « The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice.

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One thought on “Robert Hooke and the Dog’s Lung: Animal Experimentation in History « The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice

  1. After reading this, I could almost forego the medical benefits, as I feel so sad for the poor animals involved. I cannot imagine cutting open a live dog, whatever the research involved, so I conclude that is why I never became a medical pioneer.
    best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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