Alternatives for Mourning during the Great War: 1914-1918

In 1917 Reformer Dorothy Dix strongly urged an end to traditional deep mourning. She pointed out that “What the psychological effect, not only upon the minds of women, but upon men of the sight of thousands of women dressed in mourning is appalling to consider…[a woman who puts on a colored dress] saddens no one else with her sorrow. She stabs no other woman to the heart with a remembrance of her own loss…Her colored dress, worn when her very soul is black with mourning, is the red badge of courage.”

Further, mourning is costly: “the cost of a complete mourning equipment for a well to do family would buy many liberty bonds…It is said that this war is going to be won by money…Therefore, the women of the country cannot only do a big patriotic duty, but avenge their dead by…

Source: Alternatives for Mourning during the Great War: 1914-1918

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4 thoughts on “Alternatives for Mourning during the Great War: 1914-1918

  1. When I was much younger, a black armband would be worn by all family members, after the death of a close relative. I don’t remember how long they wore it, but I do recall that they had them ready, put away in drawers, for such occasions.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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