The 43: Story of how UK Jews fought a wave of post-war anti-Semitism to be subject of new TV series | News | Culture | The Independent

Sir Oswald Mosley, who re-emerged as a fascist leader after the war Getty

When Morris Beckman returned to Hackney after the Second World War, he – like other British Jewish servicemen – must have hoped his work was done in snuffing out fascism and the anti-Semitism that drove the Holocaust.

It did not take him long to realise that it was not. After arriving at his parents’ East London home after six years of service as a merchant seaman, during which he had been twice torpedoed, Mr Beckman sensed an unease. His father told him: “The Blackshirts are back, the fascists are back.”

Against a backdrop of smashed windows and anti-Jewish graffiti, Oswald Mosley and his supporters had re-named themselves the “British League of Ex-Servicemen and Women”. By early 1946, they were once more holding outdoor meetings and seeking to regain the pre-war momentum of Mosley’s British Union of Fascists.

While the language had changed – instead of railing against Jews, the Mosleyites used the euphemism “aliens” – it was clear that the intent to spread the poison of anti-Semitism by targeting London’s Jewish communities…

Source: The 43: Story of how UK Jews fought a wave of post-war anti-Semitism to be subject of new TV series | News | Culture | The Independent

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2 thoughts on “The 43: Story of how UK Jews fought a wave of post-war anti-Semitism to be subject of new TV series | News | Culture | The Independent

  1. I hope that they get this series made, it would be an illuminating look at a little-known part of British history after the war.
    As for Mosley being left to his own devices, is it any wonder? He was a Baronet, and a former MP and Government Minister. He married the daughter of Lord Curzon, and the service was in St James’s Palace. He later married Diana Mitford, with the ceremony held inside Goebbels’ house in Berlin, attended by Hitler. Even during the war, interned as known Fascists, he and his wife were allowed to share a house together, and not treated like other prisoners.
    As late as 1966, he was still standing in the election, trying to get back into Parliament. He was part of the establishment, and had friends and admirers in very high places.
    We could do with this series, to expose the favouritism shown to the minor (and major) aristocrats who openly supported the Germans, before and after the war.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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