Gallipoli 13: Turkey! Where’s Turkey?

First World War Hidden History

Map of the Gallipoli Peninsula and the NarrowsIf the Admiralty’s planning for the seaborne attack had been poor, the organisation for the military campaign was shambolic. As Les Carlyon put it so succinctly, ’Instead of being planned for months in London, down to the last artillery shell and the last bandage, this venture was being cobbled up on the spot, and only after another enterprise, the naval attack, had failed.’ [1] The only operation of similar stature that could be compared with this lay thirty years ahead on the beaches of Normandy, and the planning for that amphibious landing took not three weeks, but nearly two years. [2] Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett, British war correspondent at Gallipoli, wrote that no country other than Great Britain would have attacked the Dardanelles without months of reflection and preparation by a highly trained general staff composed of the best brains of the army. He added, ‘Never have I known such a collection…

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2 thoughts on “Gallipoli 13: Turkey! Where’s Turkey?

  1. As much as I enjoy reading these excellent and well-researched articles, I can feel my frustration building as each new episode arrives. Every additional blunder, every new example of arrogance and reputation, bought at the cost of so many lives. The sheer contempt and disregard for the brave soldiers who were killed. I need a rest now, Sarah. Phew…
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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