Murder in Lambeth, 1778

All Things Georgian

Richard Pendleton, a fisherman or waterman living in the parish of St Mary’s at Lambeth on the banks of the Thames, was a cruel man and often rained down blows upon his poor wife Elizabeth’s head. Eventually, after his frequent rages and ill treatment of her, she saw her own opportunity for revenge.

Her husband had returned home drunk, and he tumbled into their bed where he fell asleep. Waiting a while to be sure that he was senseless, Elizabeth then took up her needle and some thread, and proceeded to sew him securely into one of the blankets on the bed. When Richard awoke, he found his arms and legs were so confined that he was incapable of movement. Even more worryingly, Elizabeth stood over him with the hearth brush in her hands.

And so, in return for all the cruel punishments she had endured, Elizabeth began to beat…

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One thought on “Murder in Lambeth, 1778

  1. Not much changes over the centuries. Women are still beaten by drunkards, and sometimes die as a result. Some people seem to be destined to carry on living such lives, even in our ‘enlightened’ modern times.
    Another good story Sarah.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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