Gallipoli: Through the Soldier’s Lens | The Public Domain Review

Originally posted on The Public Domain

To mark the 100 years since Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) fought the Gallipoli campaign of WW1, Alison Wishart, Senior Curator of Photographs at Australian War Memorial, explores the remarkable photographic record left by the soldiers. Made possible by the birth of Kodak’s portable camera, the photographs give a rare and intimate portrait of the soldier’s day-to-day life away from the heat of battle.

2015 marks the centenary of one of the most commemorated events in Australia’s military history. One hundred years ago, at dawn of 25th April, boatloads of Australians and New Zealanders quietly landed on Turkey’s Gallipoli Peninsula at a beach that became known as Anzac Cove.

Had Australia’s military commanders and elected leaders known how significant this event was to become in Australia’s history and the development of its national identity, they might have thought to send official photographers or war artists. But they didn’t. Instead, the photographic record of the nine month Gallipoli campaign relies primarily on the images taken by soldiers.

Fortunately, Kodak had released its ‘Vest Pocket’ camera in 1912, which made taking a camera to the front more feasible. Kodak encouraged enlistees…

Read original: Gallipoli: Through the Soldier’s Lens | The Public Domain Review.

One thought on “Gallipoli: Through the Soldier’s Lens | The Public Domain Review

  1. An amazing collection, still poignant after 100 years have passed.
    It always strikes me how much older young men looked then; compared to similar shots today, from Iraq or Afghanistan, where the soldiers often look too young.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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