The Rebellion of Taste

e-Tinkerbell

be4The dandy was a rebel. A rebel who wielded the weapon of his unique refinement to express his contempt toward the triviality, hypocrisy,materialism, prudery of the Victorian bourgeoisie . The dandy did not follow fashion. Such a superior being would have never accepted to be homologated to the rude, tasteless masses. What is fashion after all, but a never-ending process of homologation, which not necessarily coincides with taste. The dandy embodied unattainable models of elegance and sophistication as he was the worshipper of taste, one who elevated aesthetics to a living religion, as Charles Baudelaire affirmed, the elect ” for who beautiful things mean only beauty“. (OscarWilde) be6Yet, when the word dandy first appeared, it had nothing to do with superiority and refinement, but rather, with mockery. We find word dandy, in fact, in a song, ” Yankee Doodle Dandy“, which was sung by the…

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2 thoughts on “The Rebellion of Taste

  1. I can’t deny a fondness for Brummell. Those he ridiculed seemed to set themselves up for a fall, and he lived in times where social life for the elite was a shallow affair. We mustn’t judge him by modern standards.
    James Purefoy played him to perfection, alongside a wonderful cast, in this BBC production.
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0788026/ I believe it is on Netflix.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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