An awfully big adventure: William Dalrymple on Paddy Leigh Fermor’s wartime exploits

I am currently without a working computer and having to struggle with mobile data roaming, hence the recent lack of posts. Here is a reblog about Paddy Leigh Fermor and his exploits during The Second World War when it came to kidnapping a German general. Enjoy!

Patrick Leigh Fermor

William Stanley Moss, Leigh Fermor and Emmanouil Paterakis before the kidnap of General Kreipe. Photo: The Estate of William Stanley Moss It is always good to read stuff by William Dalrymple. He is one of the writers whom I enjoy whatever he happens ot write, and I like listening to him too. In this New Statesman review he compares Abducting a General with Kidnap in Crete by Rick Stroud.

by William Dalrymple

First published in the New Statesman 4 December 2014

On 20 May 1941 the German army launched its airborne assault on Crete with the largest parachute drop in history: in less than an hour 15,000 men fell slowly into the olive groves and vineyards of the island. They had no idea that the British, using Ultra intercepts, knew of their plans and were sitting waiting for them. Resistance was so staunch – as much from ordinary Cretans as…

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