English Historical Fiction Authors: The Battle of Waterloo: Did the Weather Change History?

Background: The Battle of Waterloo was fought south of Brussels between the Allied armies commanded by the Duke of Wellington from Britain and the 72-year-old General Blücher from Prussia, and the French under the command of Napoleon Bonaparte. The French defeat at Waterloo brought an end to 23 years of war starting with the French Revolutionary wars in 1792 and continuing through the Napoleonic Wars. There was an eleven-month respite with Napoleon forced to abdicate and exiled to the island of Elba. The unpopularity of Louis XVIII, however, and the social and economic instability of France brought Napoleon back to Paris in March 1815. The Allies declared war once again. Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo marked the end of the so-called ‘100 Days,’ the Emperor’s final bid for power, and the final chapter in his remarkable career.

Why did Napoleon lose?

The battle was closely fought; either side could have won, but mistakes in leadership, communication, and judgment led, in the end, to the French defeat. Wellington said his victory was…

Read more: English Historical Fiction Authors: The Battle of Waterloo: Did the Weather Change History?

2 thoughts on “English Historical Fiction Authors: The Battle of Waterloo: Did the Weather Change History?

  1. A fascinating and important battle indeed. I think that there are so many contemporary accounts of the unusually bad weather, that we must give credence to the theory that rain changed the course of European history; or I would be having a baguette and croissants for breakfast,
    Hang on, I am! So much for Wellington…
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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