Lucile vs. M. Poiret: The Gauntlet is Thrown Down: 1912

Mrs Daffodil Digresses

A nightdress by Lucile at the Victoria & Albert Museum http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O230750/nightdress-lucile/ A nightdress by Lucile at the Victoria & Albert Museum http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O230750/nightdress-lucile/

An unfortunate difference of opinion has broken out between the men and the women dressmakers as represented by the chief European exponents of the art. On the one hand we have M. Poiret, that truly distinguished Frenchman who permits himself to minister sartorially to the women of the world, while upon the other side is Lady Duff-Gordon, the chief director of Lucile’s. In this instance the provocation comes from the man, which is so rarely the case as to be remarkable. M. Poiret was actually guilty of saying for publication that “man only can suit a woman in dress. The woman dressmaker drowns herself in details and neglects the outline.”  Now we had supposed that this was unquestionably true. The same thing has often been said before, and so far without any vociferous contradiction, and when a woman does…

View original post 852 more words

2 thoughts on “Lucile vs. M. Poiret: The Gauntlet is Thrown Down: 1912

  1. The writing style and choice of words in this article was delightful to read. Only 1912, yet a world away from today, showing how things have changed so much in 100 years. As for the dressmakers themselves, surely it was always women who actually laboured to make the garments, whether designed by men or not? I know little about dresses, but prefer the style shown, to the description of the other, with its ‘lace and frills’.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

What are your thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.